I'm a Graphic Design student and I'm actually not very good at that.

I blog about Tales of Symphonia, Abyss and Vesperia, occasionally about Fire Emblem, and whatever else that comes to mind.

My artblog is The Mistland and my Ace Attorney artblog is Turnabout Art

 

coryloftis:

Some more Wildstar.  I forget how much art was made for this game.  I think if we measured it in craptons, there would be about 14.2 bajillion.  I invented that nonsense alien alphabet to get around localizing text for other countries.  Sidestepped that headache.

fernacular:

hyaena13:

themoo-n:

kinkyturtle:

avri-wallflower:

sourcedumal:

Fuck special snowflakes who think like this.
Gurl bye
Your ass ain’t fucking special because you don’t wear makeup.
You’re not fucking better than the woman with large breasts who wears tank tops.
You’re a piece of shit because you are putting sexist stereotypes onto other women in some anti-feminine bullshit.

If you don’t like it, why’d you comment on it? I think it’s awesome and you’re probably one of the girls up there that wears makeup and shortshorts and tiny tanktops. And most kids today wear makeup because they think they aren’t pretty and need it. So deal with it. And get over yourself.

girl bye.
lemme tell you something: I wear tons of fucking make up. I wear short dresses. I walk around with a face that looks about as fake as it can get outside of a fucking barbie doll. and I like it that way. and, despite what you seem to think, no, it’s not because i think i’m ugly. i just fucking like makeup (and trust, i’ve spent years examining my own motivations and how they’re tied to internalized self-hated, fatphobia and misogyny so don’t EVEN cause you don’t know what you’re talking about).
I also read ravenously; engage in discourse regarding philosphy, art, economics, politics, race, gender, sexuality; make subversive art; and love comics and film and music. I’M A FUCKING PERSON IS WHAT I’M SAYING. 
like how fucking deep is this goddamn image when the spine of the book JUST SAYS THE WORD ‘BOOK’.
this kind of bullshit narrative, other than furthering a misogynistic dichotomy that pits women against each other, is also a complete fucking fallacy. A huge majority of average women DON’T DO THIS. you aren’t the lone plain jane in an army of cake-faced, bottle blonde barbies—if you look around, you’ll see that most women just throw on jeans and tops and very little makeup. 
I get that this kind of shit is an attempt to fight back against media-made images of what womanhood is supposed to be. I get it. (thought isn’t it interesting that the “weirdo” in the picture is still thin and conventionally attractive??)
but attacking other women who you perceive as being stupid or carbon copies because of their fucking appearance doesn’t fight back against shit. it actually does EXACTLY what the patriarchy wants us to do—engenders more hatred and competition between women. 
but you know, whatever, continue to think you’re so goddamn special. i’ll be over here reading AND wearing hot pink lipstick and having a hell of a time doing it. 

THIS IS THE BEST FUCKING THING I’VE EVER READ IN THE HISTORY OF EVER

And that is how you tear a fake feminist to shreds. Bravo.

preach

fernacular:

hyaena13:

themoo-n:

kinkyturtle:

avri-wallflower:

sourcedumal:

Fuck special snowflakes who think like this.

Gurl bye

Your ass ain’t fucking special because you don’t wear makeup.

You’re not fucking better than the woman with large breasts who wears tank tops.

You’re a piece of shit because you are putting sexist stereotypes onto other women in some anti-feminine bullshit.

If you don’t like it, why’d you comment on it? I think it’s awesome and you’re probably one of the girls up there that wears makeup and shortshorts and tiny tanktops. And most kids today wear makeup because they think they aren’t pretty and need it. So deal with it. And get over yourself.

girl bye.

lemme tell you something: I wear tons of fucking make up. I wear short dresses. I walk around with a face that looks about as fake as it can get outside of a fucking barbie doll. and I like it that way. and, despite what you seem to think, no, it’s not because i think i’m ugly. i just fucking like makeup (and trust, i’ve spent years examining my own motivations and how they’re tied to internalized self-hated, fatphobia and misogyny so don’t EVEN cause you don’t know what you’re talking about).

I also read ravenously; engage in discourse regarding philosphy, art, economics, politics, race, gender, sexuality; make subversive art; and love comics and film and music. I’M A FUCKING PERSON IS WHAT I’M SAYING. 

like how fucking deep is this goddamn image when the spine of the book JUST SAYS THE WORD ‘BOOK’.

this kind of bullshit narrative, other than furthering a misogynistic dichotomy that pits women against each other, is also a complete fucking fallacy. A huge majority of average women DON’T DO THIS. you aren’t the lone plain jane in an army of cake-faced, bottle blonde barbies—if you look around, you’ll see that most women just throw on jeans and tops and very little makeup. 

I get that this kind of shit is an attempt to fight back against media-made images of what womanhood is supposed to be. I get it. (thought isn’t it interesting that the “weirdo” in the picture is still thin and conventionally attractive??)

but attacking other women who you perceive as being stupid or carbon copies because of their fucking appearance doesn’t fight back against shit. it actually does EXACTLY what the patriarchy wants us to do—engenders more hatred and competition between women. 

but you know, whatever, continue to think you’re so goddamn special. i’ll be over here reading AND wearing hot pink lipstick and having a hell of a time doing it. 

THIS IS THE BEST FUCKING THING I’VE EVER READ IN THE HISTORY OF EVER

And that is how you tear a fake feminist to shreds. Bravo.

preach

thisisnotjapan:

weareallmixedup:

tamathestoryteller:

weareallmixedup:

Japan seems to be very fanatic over things, but you do think this is alright? It could be compared to ‘otakus’ 

———————

Firstly, “japan seems to be very fanatic over things” uhhhhhh can we not do this please? Like are we really gonna do that?

In my opinion this feels very much like blackface, it definitely feels like “trying on” blackness, it definitely comodifies blackness. This may be a “”“style”“” but what about the harsh reality of colourism in East Asia (I can only really speak on that from a broader point because I’m not Japanese)?  Not to mention blackface and anti-blackness that I continue to see in East Asian pop culture. What about Black Japanese people? Their existence is not a costume to be put on and taken off.

I am not Japanese nor have I ever been to Japan so any opinions from people with more information will be greatly appreciated.

- Melody

I agree that excessive tanning in Japan and trying to replicate “black style” might be misguided, as it closely resembles black face. Another questionable trend is to try to look mixed race in Japan and Korea. The thing you have to understand is that Japan and other Asian countries are very homogenous, and have less understanding of racial diversity or systematic discrimination. While they have their own history with racial discrimination with smaller groups inside the country, people of different ethnicities do not look as different as they do in North America.

To them when they see your ethnic differences they may see “black style” as more of an aesthetic of features or style then a culture or personal identity to be stolen. I don’t think they understand the connotations that black face has for people. I’m not they should just get a pass, but I think their hearts are in the right place and they are just trying to pay homage to a culture they admire. Just like Otakus I imagine they’re are some that are ignorant and fanatical, and some that are more respectful and really try to educate themselves to prevent cultural appropriation.

Woah woah woah, there is a limit to how far you can go with cultural relativism. The world is global now and I don’t think we can pretend that there is absolutely no understanding of blackface and anti-blackness in East Asian countries. You’re using the same argument that many people use to back up many other incidences of cultural appropriation. “Their hearts are in the right place” and “they couldn’t possibly know any better” is not good enough. And how could you possibly compare an obsession with anime/manga with the obvious fetishization and cultural appropriation of black people and black culture???? Blackness isn’t a “style,” it’s not a costume, it’s not something that people can use as a trend, regardless of how “”“admiring”“” or “”“respectful”“” they are.

- Melody

Sure they probably don’t know the full implications of what they are doing but when has that ever made anything ok? They don’t need excuses made for them, Japanese people who do b-style are causing just as much damage whether they recognize it or not. 

timbeon:

sailorlucina:

The thing with Nanaly’s design specifically is that I never got the feeling of sexualization from it?
I mean, yeah, just having a breast plate as a top is pretty impractical for combat, but whenever I look at her, I don’t get the air that Inomata was deliberately designing her to be “sexy”. Whereas with Sheena, she has giant knockers and an exposed bra, and Presa looks like a “femme fatale” I would’ve tried to design when I was 14. They’re designed in a way that are deliberately drawing attention to certain parts of their bodies; it’s possible to have a character in clothing that’s considered “revealing” without objectification being the intent. It all has to do with presentation. Presa and Sheena are presented with that intent, Nanaly honestly isn’t.
That said, I do think that people ragging on Alisha’s/Alicia’s/Arisha’s/whatever her name is shorts for being supposedly fanservicey are kinda off the mark. While again, shorts while otherwise being prepared for combat are impractical, I don’t get the idea that she’s meant to be ogled when I look at her.
Though ultimately I guess this is all a matter of how each individual sees them. Some may see them being objectified, some don’t. Perspective and all that.

Here’s where I think the main difference lies between “sexy” outfits designed by Inomata and “sexy” outfits designed by Fujishima and Okumura. This is something that Bob Chipman/”MovieBob” of The Escapist discussed once in an episode of The Big Picture that I think hits the nail on the head here (“Gender Games,” keep in mind that it’s from 2011 and his views have grown and evolved over time, but the core point he’s getting at about character design and presentation still holds up really well).
Here’s Nanaly’s official artwork, and here’s Presa’s. Look at both of them. Instead of paying attention to the character’s outfits themselves, pay attention to how they’re being worn. Pay attention to how the characters are posed and the facial expressions they’re drawn with. Granted this is going to be extremely subjective, but what’s the general impression you get about the characters from their artwork?
Nanaly’s pose and expression suggest confidence and courage. Sure, maybe sexuality is there, but the dominant idea Inomata seems to be trying to get across with Nanaly’s pose and expression is “this is a character who is good at what she does and is proud of it.” She is deliberately presenting Nanaly in a way that is trying to tell you something about the kind of person she is.
Now compare that with Presa. What’s the idea you get about Presa’s character from her artwork? Maybe a little aloofness in the expression, and you can probably guess that she’s a mage from her weapon, but the dominant idea about Presa that’s being conveyed is “this character is sexy and titillating.” Okumura is not trying to convey something about the kind of person Presa is (cunning, intelligent, secretive, guarded, mysterious, stoic). He’s presenting her as an object for the audience to ogle. To quote MovieBob, she is posed and presented like “there’s a full-length mirror somewhere just outside the frame, and she’s checking herself out…She’s not posing that way to reveal something about her character, she’s posing that way to break the fourth wall and put on a peep show for a presumably (straight) male audience.”
This also extends to how the characters are presented in the game- Nanaly is an active participant and the dominant figure in her character arc. You experience Nanaly’s character and story firsthand from Nanaly herself. It’s hard to gauge her animations, since Destiny 2 used 2-dimensional sprites, and Radiant Mythology didn’t focus much on the character models, but we can gauge her actresses’ performances, and both Tomoko Kawakami and Yumi Kakazu portrayed her primarily as strong and confident.
Presa, on the other hand, is not an active participant in her story. It’s told entirely through Alvin’s perspective, and primarily through (optional and missable) sidequests, and her role in Xillia 2 is entirely to further Alvin’s story- unlike the appearances by Wingul, Agria, and Jiao, it doesn’t tell us anything new about her. Her model is animated as though she’s posing for glamor shots on a catwalk, and both Rina Sato’s and Ali Hillis’s voice work as her carries the undertone that she’s trying to seduce whoever she’s talking to.
Lastly, let’s look at their mystic arte cut-ins. Here’s Nanaly’s only full cut-in (from Tales of VS, Destiny 2’s were face-only and Radiant Mythology 2 and 3’s were bust-up), and here’s Presa’s. The focal point of Nanaly’s is her weapon, and the implication of the pose and expression, like most mystic arte cut-ins, is “I’m going to end this fight!” The focal point of Presa’s is her breasts and exposed stomach, and the pose and expression convey “I am about to fall over backwards and get a cramp in my back from contorting like this to show off my figure” more than anything else.
In summary, Nanaly’s revealing outfit doesn’t bother me because she is posed and portrayed in ways that convey her personality, and attention is very rarely drawn to the fact that her outfit is revealing. She is a character, not a sexual object. Whereas everything about Presa is intentionally emphasizing her exposed skin and reducing her to an object.
This is something that I really like about Inomata’s character designs- she’s designed several female characters for the Tales series who wear outfits that show skin or have aspects common to outfits designed to be sexy or cater to fetishes (like bare midriffs, low-cut tops, way-too-short skirts/shorts, and thigh-high socks/boots with said way-too-short skirts/shorts), but "sexy" is not at all the impression I get from looking at any of these ladies.

timbeon:

sailorlucina:

The thing with Nanaly’s design specifically is that I never got the feeling of sexualization from it?

I mean, yeah, just having a breast plate as a top is pretty impractical for combat, but whenever I look at her, I don’t get the air that Inomata was deliberately designing her to be “sexy”. Whereas with Sheena, she has giant knockers and an exposed bra, and Presa looks like a “femme fatale” I would’ve tried to design when I was 14. They’re designed in a way that are deliberately drawing attention to certain parts of their bodies; it’s possible to have a character in clothing that’s considered “revealing” without objectification being the intent. It all has to do with presentation. Presa and Sheena are presented with that intent, Nanaly honestly isn’t.

That said, I do think that people ragging on Alisha’s/Alicia’s/Arisha’s/whatever her name is shorts for being supposedly fanservicey are kinda off the mark. While again, shorts while otherwise being prepared for combat are impractical, I don’t get the idea that she’s meant to be ogled when I look at her.

Though ultimately I guess this is all a matter of how each individual sees them. Some may see them being objectified, some don’t. Perspective and all that.

Here’s where I think the main difference lies between “sexy” outfits designed by Inomata and “sexy” outfits designed by Fujishima and Okumura. This is something that Bob Chipman/”MovieBob” of The Escapist discussed once in an episode of The Big Picture that I think hits the nail on the head here (“Gender Games,” keep in mind that it’s from 2011 and his views have grown and evolved over time, but the core point he’s getting at about character design and presentation still holds up really well).

Here’s Nanaly’s official artwork, and here’s Presa’s. Look at both of them. Instead of paying attention to the character’s outfits themselves, pay attention to how they’re being worn. Pay attention to how the characters are posed and the facial expressions they’re drawn with. Granted this is going to be extremely subjective, but what’s the general impression you get about the characters from their artwork?

Nanaly’s pose and expression suggest confidence and courage. Sure, maybe sexuality is there, but the dominant idea Inomata seems to be trying to get across with Nanaly’s pose and expression is “this is a character who is good at what she does and is proud of it.” She is deliberately presenting Nanaly in a way that is trying to tell you something about the kind of person she is.

Now compare that with Presa. What’s the idea you get about Presa’s character from her artwork? Maybe a little aloofness in the expression, and you can probably guess that she’s a mage from her weapon, but the dominant idea about Presa that’s being conveyed is “this character is sexy and titillating.” Okumura is not trying to convey something about the kind of person Presa is (cunning, intelligent, secretive, guarded, mysterious, stoic). He’s presenting her as an object for the audience to ogle. To quote MovieBob, she is posed and presented like “there’s a full-length mirror somewhere just outside the frame, and she’s checking herself out…She’s not posing that way to reveal something about her character, she’s posing that way to break the fourth wall and put on a peep show for a presumably (straight) male audience.”

This also extends to how the characters are presented in the game- Nanaly is an active participant and the dominant figure in her character arc. You experience Nanaly’s character and story firsthand from Nanaly herself. It’s hard to gauge her animations, since Destiny 2 used 2-dimensional sprites, and Radiant Mythology didn’t focus much on the character models, but we can gauge her actresses’ performances, and both Tomoko Kawakami and Yumi Kakazu portrayed her primarily as strong and confident.

Presa, on the other hand, is not an active participant in her story. It’s told entirely through Alvin’s perspective, and primarily through (optional and missable) sidequests, and her role in Xillia 2 is entirely to further Alvin’s story- unlike the appearances by Wingul, Agria, and Jiao, it doesn’t tell us anything new about her. Her model is animated as though she’s posing for glamor shots on a catwalk, and both Rina Sato’s and Ali Hillis’s voice work as her carries the undertone that she’s trying to seduce whoever she’s talking to.

Lastly, let’s look at their mystic arte cut-ins. Here’s Nanaly’s only full cut-in (from Tales of VS, Destiny 2’s were face-only and Radiant Mythology 2 and 3’s were bust-up), and here’s Presa’s. The focal point of Nanaly’s is her weapon, and the implication of the pose and expression, like most mystic arte cut-ins, is “I’m going to end this fight!” The focal point of Presa’s is her breasts and exposed stomach, and the pose and expression convey “I am about to fall over backwards and get a cramp in my back from contorting like this to show off my figure” more than anything else.

In summary, Nanaly’s revealing outfit doesn’t bother me because she is posed and portrayed in ways that convey her personality, and attention is very rarely drawn to the fact that her outfit is revealing. She is a character, not a sexual object. Whereas everything about Presa is intentionally emphasizing her exposed skin and reducing her to an object.

This is something that I really like about Inomata’s character designs- she’s designed several female characters for the Tales series who wear outfits that show skin or have aspects common to outfits designed to be sexy or cater to fetishes (like bare midriffs, low-cut tops, way-too-short skirts/shorts, and thigh-high socks/boots with said way-too-short skirts/shorts), but "sexy" is not at all the impression I get from looking at any of these ladies.

different-cultures-and-justice:

fuckingradfems:

ianbaerwolf:

donitaruga:

glassbottledemon:

Male rape victim talks about why he finds male rape funny at the Atomic Vaudeville Cabaret in June of 2012.

Full Video: [x]

GIFs made by /u/inadreamscape

This always makes me cry.

God damn it makes me sad

This makes me so sad every time it crosses my dash. Forever reblog.

i legitimately almost teared up because nobody should go through that

yanderehikari:

From a designers standpoint, there are several things to consider before deeming an outfit to be purely ‘fetishy’ those being:
Does it serve an actual purpose?
Is it appropriate with the npcs in the area, as well as the rest of the cast?
Are the majority of the cast wearing similar designs to it?
If the answer to any of those is NO then yes, it is fetishy.
That being said, with Sheena, her outfit is rather appropriate. She’s wearing very light, very maneuverable clothes reminiscent of Japanese kimono, which is what her culture is based off of. As far as the other cast members, Zelos is showing the same amount of skin, Regal shows MORE skin, Presea and Genis show more skin, and Raine, Lloyd, and Collete are 100% clothed. So no. It’s not exactly ‘Fetishy’. Could they do to raise the brassiere line a bit? Sure. But that’s the animation team, not the actual design. (plus, it’s not actually a bra, it’s just a tank top with the straps off)
Nanaly, I’m not sure on, since I didn’t play the game, so I’m not going to touch that. (Though, from just looking at the party, it does look fetishy)
As for Presa, though. Don’t get me started. Her entire CHARACTER is a walking piece of sex on legs, though it’s not her fault. She wasn’t given a personallity, and was forced into an opened up spandex jumpsuit that REALLY doesn’t make any sense. She lives in a climate that snows constantly, and is also a battle mage. All things considered, it would be more appropriate to shove her in a set of robes, similar to Farah. And this includes all of the females in Xillia. Besides Leia, none of them should be wearing shorts, since they live in colder climates, so Agria, Milla, and Presa are all going to be freezing their asses off because their home temperatures are much colder than what they’re dressed for. And I mean, just look at the guys, and the NPCs, all of them in everywhere except Leronde are dressed for temperatures under 60 degrees F.
Xillia is awful with its practicallity, and is deemed entirely fetishy. (At least in Xillia 2 they made everyone dress a little more appropriately, though ended up making Elize the lolicon idol)
I mean, shit, the only game that doesn’t obviously have fan-service outfits in it is Tales of the Abyss, though they kinda blew it by making Tear the ‘big busted mysterious girl’, though they at least made up for it by not sticking her in a skimpy swimsuit, and actually thought about what she’d do. (And Natalia, for example, does wear more risque clothes, though that’s in character for her, I feel, since she is very outgoing and adventurous, and likes enjoying her body, and flaunting it a bit. Though that might just be her trying to seduce Asch lmao)
TLDR: Regardless of who it is, every designer has some flaws, some larger than others.

I think they also mention in TotA that Natalia has her maids dress her everyday, so she’s actually used to be seen with little to no clothing at all. And about Arisha, this i the first thin that came to mind when she was revealed : http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zettai_ryōiki

yanderehikari:

From a designers standpoint, there are several things to consider before deeming an outfit to be purely ‘fetishy’ those being:

Does it serve an actual purpose?

Is it appropriate with the npcs in the area, as well as the rest of the cast?

Are the majority of the cast wearing similar designs to it?

If the answer to any of those is NO then yes, it is fetishy.

That being said, with Sheena, her outfit is rather appropriate. She’s wearing very light, very maneuverable clothes reminiscent of Japanese kimono, which is what her culture is based off of. As far as the other cast members, Zelos is showing the same amount of skin, Regal shows MORE skin, Presea and Genis show more skin, and Raine, Lloyd, and Collete are 100% clothed. So no. It’s not exactly ‘Fetishy’. Could they do to raise the brassiere line a bit? Sure. But that’s the animation team, not the actual design. (plus, it’s not actually a bra, it’s just a tank top with the straps off)

Nanaly, I’m not sure on, since I didn’t play the game, so I’m not going to touch that. (Though, from just looking at the party, it does look fetishy)

As for Presa, though. Don’t get me started. Her entire CHARACTER is a walking piece of sex on legs, though it’s not her fault. She wasn’t given a personallity, and was forced into an opened up spandex jumpsuit that REALLY doesn’t make any sense. She lives in a climate that snows constantly, and is also a battle mage. All things considered, it would be more appropriate to shove her in a set of robes, similar to Farah. And this includes all of the females in Xillia. Besides Leia, none of them should be wearing shorts, since they live in colder climates, so Agria, Milla, and Presa are all going to be freezing their asses off because their home temperatures are much colder than what they’re dressed for. And I mean, just look at the guys, and the NPCs, all of them in everywhere except Leronde are dressed for temperatures under 60 degrees F.

Xillia is awful with its practicallity, and is deemed entirely fetishy. (At least in Xillia 2 they made everyone dress a little more appropriately, though ended up making Elize the lolicon idol)

I mean, shit, the only game that doesn’t obviously have fan-service outfits in it is Tales of the Abyss, though they kinda blew it by making Tear the ‘big busted mysterious girl’, though they at least made up for it by not sticking her in a skimpy swimsuit, and actually thought about what she’d do. (And Natalia, for example, does wear more risque clothes, though that’s in character for her, I feel, since she is very outgoing and adventurous, and likes enjoying her body, and flaunting it a bit. Though that might just be her trying to seduce Asch lmao)

TLDR: Regardless of who it is, every designer has some flaws, some larger than others.

I think they also mention in TotA that Natalia has her maids dress her everyday, so she’s actually used to be seen with little to no clothing at all.

And about Arisha, this i the first thin that came to mind when she was revealed :

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zettai_ryōiki